British Bugle Calls

The following is from
Farmersboys' British Army Bugle Calls

and are MP3 files.

Rations
Parade for Piquet
Alarm (for Troops to turn out under Arms)
Fire Alarm
Officers' Dress for Dinner
Officers' Dinner
Serjeants' Dinner
Men's Meal (1st Call)
Men's Meal (2nd Call)
Salute for Guard (to be used on all occasions when bugles are required to sound a salute and the General Salute is not to be used)
General Salute (for Field-Marshals, Generals, Lieutenant-Generals, and Major-Generals)
Reveille (also known as the Long Reveille)
Rouse (also known as Reveille)
Charlie Reveille
Retreat
Tattoo (1st Post)
Last Post (Tattoo)
Lights Out

For more information on British Army Bugle and Field Calls, please see The Farmer Boys Bugle Calls web page at http://www.farmersboys.com/MAIN/Bugles_Calls.htm

And the following is courtesy of our friends at The 65th.

Words of Command
and
Bugle Sounds

from the
1862 Field Drill Manual

The two youngest members of the CD were the buglers Harris and Butler, aged 15 and 16 respectively.

1.    Light infantry movements must in general be regulated by word of command.  Commands must be repeated by the captains and every supernumerary belonging to the line of skirmishers.  The connecting links may be employed, when necessary, to pass words of command, or convey intelligence backwards and forwards between the reserve and supports, and between the supports and skirmishers.  When on account of the distance, or from noise or wind, the voice cannot be distinctly heard, the connecting links should run up and deliver their orders to the officers for whom they are intended, and then resume their places.

2.    Calls on the bugle may occasionally be necessary as substitutes for the voice, but as they are liable to be misunderstood, and as they reveal intended movements to the enemy, who will soon become acquainted with them, they should seldom be used, unless for purposes of drill.

3.    Bugle sounds must be as few and as simple as possible.  None but the following sounds must ever be used in light drill:

4.    One G sounded (hear note) on the bugle denotes the right of the line.  Two G's the centre.  Three G's the left.

5.    The G's preceding any sound denote the part of the line to which it applies.  For instance; two G's before the Extend, signifies to extend from the Centre.  One G followed by the Close, to close to the Right.  One G followed by the Incline, to incline to the right.  Three G's, followed by the Wheel, to wheel to the left.

I. EXTEND.

Extend - Click to hear tune

II. CLOSE.

Close - click to hear tune

III. ADVANCE.

Advance - Click to hear tune

IV. RETIRE.

Retire - Click to hear tune

V. HALT.

Halt - click to hear tune

The Halt annuls all previous sounds except the Fire.

VI. COMMENCE FIRING

Commence Firing - Click to hear tune

VII. CEASE FIRING

Cease Firing - Click to hear tune

VIII. ASSEMBLE

Assemble - click to hear tune

IX. INCLINE

Incline - click to hear tune

X. WHEEL

Wheel - click to hear tune

The calls IX. and X. must be preceded by the distinguishing G's.

XI. THE ALARM, OR LOOK OUT FOR CAVALRY.

Alarm - Click to hear tune

XII. THE QUICK TIME.

Quick Time - Click to hear tune

XIII. THE DOUBLE TIME.

Double - Click here to hear tune

XIV. LIE DOWN.

Lie Down - Click to hear tune

XV. RISE.

Rise - Click to hear tune

6.    Every regiment should have a well marked and simple regimental call.

7.    The Advance or the Retire sounded when inclining to the flank, indicates that the original direction is to be resumed.

8.    When moving by sound of bugle, men will wait till the bugle has ceased before they move.

9.    When THE FIRE is combined with any other call, it should always be the last sounded, for if the men commenced firing they would not hear the second call.

10.    The commanding officer's bugle will generally be found sufficient in light infantry drill; repeated sounds only create confusion and delay.

11.    Bugle sounds do not apply to bodies of troops in reserve.

Born in Maghera, Co. Londonderry -1822

On 14 September 1857 at Delhi, India, Bugler Robert Hawthorne of the 52nd Regiment, accompanied the explosion party in the desperate task of blowing in the Kashmir Gate.  He not only performed the dangerous duty on which he was employed, but, under heavy musketry fire, bound up the wounds on one of the officers of the party, who had been badly hurt.

Robert Hawthorne died 2nd February 1879, and is buried in an unmarked grave in Ardwick Cemetery - Manchester

His Victoria Cross was purchased in 1909 by the officers of the 52nd Regt., at the sale of Mr. J. B. Gaskell`s medal collection, and is now housed in The Royal Green Jackets Museum, Winchester.


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